Women's Suffrage in the 19th Century
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This unit explores women's suffrage issues in the 19th century.

Title:
Women's Suffrage in the 19th Century

Molly Laden

[7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12]

11-18

History and Social Sciences

Students will apply the basic principles of historical thinking by researching and weighing primary information sources, and forming their own conclusions from those sources to interpret the growth of the women's rights movement in the United States.


Content Outcomes:
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  • Students will be able to discuss social studies content from a variety of content areas; develop basic skills in the areas of graphics, time lines, diagrams, charts, tables, outlines, and geography (History and Social Science)
  • Students will be able to identify and use in sentences key vocabulary terms (History and Social Science)
  • Students will be able to analyze the balance between the rights and responsibilities of United States citizenship (History and Social Science)
  • Students will be able to explain the major political, social, and economic events of the early to late 19th century (History and Social Science)
  • Students will be able to research historical data from both print and non-print sources (History and Social Science)
  • Students will be able to describe the revolutionary and reform movements that reshaped politics of Europe and the Americas in the 1800s. (History and Social Science)
  • Students will be able to detail the causes that led to the labor union movement. (History and Social Science)
  • Students will be expected to apply what they have learned from earlier social studies courses to an examination of major issues, events, and personalities of the US and the world. Topics studied will include population, immigration, affirmative action, terrorism, global economic competition, pollution, campaign finance reform, and the post-Presidential Election 2000 analysis. (History and Social Science)

    Technology Outcomes:
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  • Primary source newspaper articles, Massachusetts General Court documents, online books, images.


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    25 (Hours)

    Intermediate ELL skills. Use of graphic organizers. Use of reading strategies.

    Analyzing, organizing, writing, and editing skills.

    Students need computer competency and access to a computer.

    Students should understand the difference between primary and secondary sources.

    For students in the "Women's Voices in the Mid 19th Century" lesson, students should have completed the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention: What are we fighting for?" lesson or have background knowledge on the Seneca Falls Convention.

    For students to participate in the Seneca Falls lesson, they should have background knowledge in the Enlightenment and American Revolution, and they should have studied major developments in world history through the 19th century.


      15 hours
    Activity
    Women's Voices in the Mid-19th Century:

    Activity 1: Students will use primary and secondary sources to discover what forces motivated three women reformers to work for change.

    Activity 2: Students will understand the costs and benefits of speaking out through the analysis of autobiographies, articles, pictures, artifacts, songs, biographies and videos.

    Activity 3: Students will create a PowerPoint presentation about one of the women reformers.

    Organizational Notes

      4 hours
    Activity
    1848 Seneca Falls Convention:

    Activity 1: Students will read the “Introduction” and “Task” components of the lesson. These will provide a foundation for the lesson, its purpose and activities.

    Activity 2: Students will receive printed copies of an image analysis worksheet. They will answer questions on the worksheet after examining a cartoon, drawing or photograph from the early 1800s.

    Activity 3: Students will receive a “Life of a woman in the early 1800s” web diagram worksheet. They will complete the web diagram following examination and discussion of the provided primary sources images from the early 1800s.

    Activity 4: Students will receive a “Seneca Falls Women’s Rights Convention” cause and effect chart. They will complete the causes column following the discussion of the provided primary sources images and teacher instruction about life in the early 1800s. Activity 5: Students together will read aloud a news article about the World Anti-Slavery Convention in the London Daily News and determine additional specific causes for the Seneca Falls Convention. Add the ideas to the “causes” column of the Seneca Falls Women’s Rights Convention chart.

    Activity 6: After viewing and discussing the information presented in an announcement about the 1848 Women’s Rights Convention, students will locate and read information about the organizers (Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, Martha Wright, Mary Ann M'Clintock and Jane Hunt) on the National Park Service website for the Seneca Falls Convention.

    Activity 7: In pairs, students will read the newspaper account of the convention and the Declaration of Sentiments and use the document analysis worksheet to understand it. Afterwards they will discuss their findings as a class and fill in the “event” column of the Convention cause and effect chart.

    Activity 8: Students will determine whether they would have attended the convention and if so, whether they would have signed the Declaration of Sentiments. They will read and interpret primary source news articles to understand the public reactions to the convention and then implement their findings in a panel discussion during which they must clearly express either support for or rejection of the Declaration of Sentiments. Randomly place the students in one of four groups: Panel member Pros, Panel member Cons, Journalist Pro, or Journalist Con.

    Activity 9: Students will meet in their assigned groups to plan and write either their assigned arguments (panelists) or at least five questions (journalists).

    Activity 10: The panel will assemble as a mock Press Conference. The panelists will present their cases and counterarguments while the journalists ask questions and challenge the presentations.

    Activity 11: Following the Press Conference, guide students in a debriefing session in which they should discuss the ideas presented and their impressions of them. At the same time, students should fill in the “effect” column of the Convention cause and effect chart. Extended activity: require each student to research the women’s rights movement in another country. Students should create a multi-media presentation showing the similarities and differences between the movement there and in the United States.

    Organizational Notes
    •This lesson will help students review the Enlightenment ideals fundamental to the creation of the United States. •This lesson will provide students with information which will help them to understand the economic, social and political factors in the United States that motivated women to convene the first national women’s rights convention at Seneca Falls, NY, in 1848. •This lesson will provide students with information which will help them to understand the impact of and reaction to the Seneca Falls Convention.

    •The image analysis worksheet is designed to guide students as they encounter their primary source image. •Throughout the examination process, the teacher should encourage students to incorporate specific examples in their analysis. •The teacher should not reveal the description or title for the image until after it is presented so the students are able to discern the meaning on their own.

    •The web diagram worksheet will help the students to organize their ideas about reasons women would desire to organize and attend a convention about their natural rights.

    •Use the suggested resources to gain additional information about life of women in the early 19th century in order to provide knowledge about aspects not represented by the images. •Students should discuss their observations and combine their insights to form the conclusion that women mostly worked in the home caring for their families or later in poor conditions at mills, did not have protection under marriage laws, were limited in their access to education, were shunned from public speaking, were restricted in their clothing, and were excluded from the democratic process by not being allowed to vote.

    •Guide students in understanding that women, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott, attended the convention in London but were not allowed to participate.

    •The document analysis worksheet is designed to guide students as they examine this primary source. •Throughout the examination process, the teacher should encourage students to incorporate direct quotes and examples in their analysis.

    •Encourage the students to fully explain their viewpoint or create detailed questions using evidence from the primary source documents and images.

      6 hours
    Activity
    Women's Voices in the Mid-19th Century: Activity 1: Students will conduct research about the national Women's Rights Convention in Worcester using primary and secondary sources.

    Activity 2: Students will analyze sources in order to reach a conclusion about the impact of the convention on women's domestic roles.

    Activity 3: Students will create a skit that demonstrates public perceptions of women based on the sources used.

    Activity 4: Students will develop a personal journey entry, editorial or visual product supporting or opposing their decision to attend or not attend the national convention.

    Organizational Notes


    Teachers evaluate document analysis and political cartoon worksheets. Lesson rubrics provide guidelines for assessment


    Encourage class discussion as documents and images are analyzed. Explore correlations between the women in the 1800s and other groups of people in the United States and elsewhere struggling to gain basic rights today.

    Lessons may need to be adapted to particular educational needs. Several of these lessons were designed for ELL history courses.